Learning Matters on PBS NewsHour

 

Learning Matters' reporting for PBS NewsHour is currently made possible by the following funders:
The Brin Wojcicki Foundation,Carnegie Corporation of New York, The Wallace Foundation, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation , the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Tietz Family Foundation.

Subscribe subscribe what's this
WATCH: Opt Out Movement

Watch and join the discussion!

WATCH: Opt Out Movement

This month about 15 million students are scheduled to take the first round of the Common Core nationalized tests. Across the country - and political spectrum - a strong rebellion has emerged with one unified message: students must refuse to take these tests.

Mar 11th, 2015 | 1 comment | 1,509 Views
WATCH: Rural Schools in McDowell County - Part 2

Watch and join the discussion!

WATCH: Rural Schools in McDowell County - Part 2

In West Virginia’s McDowell County, parents and caregivers often lack the support necessary to raise happy, healthy children. In the second of his two part report, John Tulenko looks at new programs that offer a ray of hope.

Feb 4th, 2015 | 1 comment | 4,964 Views
WATCH: Rural Schools in McDowell County - Part 1

Watch and join the discussion!

WATCH: Rural Schools in McDowell County - Part 1

McDowell County, WV, is a hard place to be a kid. The former coal mining community is the poorest in the state, with the highest rates of drug overdose, suicide, and heart disease. A new initiative, which includes the teacher union, is trying to turn this around.

Feb 3rd, 2015 | 2 comments | 7,891 Views
WATCH: Abandon Ship! Is the Common Core Sinking?

Watch and join the discussion!

WATCH: Abandon Ship! Is the Common Core Sinking?

Drawing on a 1950's Hollywood shipwreck film, this report brings viewers up-to-date on the Common Core's unfolding dramas.

Dec 25th, 2014 | 1 comment | 10,086 Views
WATCH: Philadelphia Schools Fighting Back - Part 2

Watch and join the discussion!

WATCH: Philadelphia Schools Fighting Back - Part 2

Philadelphia's low-performing traditional schools are hemorrhaging students. So superintendent William Hite is fighting back, giving students an incentive to return by opening three high schools with innovative, project-based curriculums. Will it work?

Dec 2nd, 2014 | 0 comments | 6,506 Views
Facebook Twitter Google Plus Youtube
Join Our Mailing List
Email: