August 14th, 2007

No Child Left Behind: The Program

The federal law known as No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has forever changed the American education system.  Enacted by President Bush in 2001, its aim was to standardize accountability.  But it seems to have done so much more.

Learning Matters created a three-part series on NCLB in 2007; it was complemented by twelve (12) podcasts. You can find all the relevant content on this page.

This program is made possible by the following funders:
Grade Level Reading Fund of the Tides Foundation, The Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki Foundation, The Wallace Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.


RELATED PODCASTS

PodcastThe Sheer Reality

Anthony Cody was a board-certified teacher for close to two decades. NCLB passed, and he left the classroom. Hear his story. Listen to the story.



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Podcast 2

Marian Wright Edelman

In a “From the Vault” podcast, Marian Wright Edelman talks about the pros and cons of NCLB. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 3

A Look Back

John Merrow looks back at NCLB with two prominent education advisers as its first renewal comes up. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 4

Bill Sanders

Bill Sanders is one of America’s top education researchers. Here, he discusses how to measure learning — and how that fits in with NCLB. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 5

Margaret Spellings

John Merrow speaks to Ed. Secretary Margaret Spellings about the perceived loopholes in No Child Left Behind. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 6

Chester Finn

Ed guru Chester Finn discusses some of the biggest loopholes in NCLB. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 7

The Effect On Principals

What did NCLB mean for principals? We sat down with one — Jay McClain — and found out. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 8

A Snapshot

Want to understand NCLB at a micro-level? Here’s a portrait of a fifth-grade classroom as affected by the law. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 9

Lynn Riggs

Is NCLB causing teachers to push the right answers at students, rather than forcing them to find the right questions? Listen to the story.


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Podcast 9

Alan Bersin

San Diego ed reformer Alan Bersin on NCLB lessons learned. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 9

Michelle Evans

Michelle Evans was not pleased with the conditions at her son’s middle school — so using a provision of NCLB, she changed them. Listen to the story.


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Podcast 9

Omaha To Washington DC

NCLB is a policy discussion — so how does that end up looking at in a classroom in Omaha, Nebraska? Listen to the story.

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7 comments

[...] You can watch the series right here. [...]

[...] would take a long time; Learning Matters produced an award-winning series on it a few years ago, which you can see here. In my view, the best thing about NCLB was its insistence on ‘disaggregating’ data so that high [...]

[...] would take a long time; Learning Matters produced an award-winning series on it a few years ago, which you can see here. In my view, the best thing about NCLB was its insistence on ‘disaggregating’ data so [...]

[...] would take a long time; Learning Matters produced an award-winning series on it a few years ago, which you can see here. In my view, the best thing about NCLB was its insistence on ‘disaggregating’ data so [...]

[...] would take a long time; Learning Matters produced an award-winning series on it a few years ago, which you can see here. In my view, the best thing about NCLB was its insistence on ‘disaggregating’ data so [...]

[...] 2005: Chicago International Television Awards - Certificate of Merit “Continuing Coverage of the No Child Left Behind Act” [...]

[...] would take a long time; Learning Matters produced an award-winning series on it a few years ago, which you can see here. In my view, the best thing about NCLB was its insistence on ‘disaggregating’ data so [...]




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